Let’s assume that you have a Windows-based server, named SERVER.

You created a Cargador catalogue with local path: x:\data\cargador.catalog. You shared this folder in the read-only mode with network path \SERVER\cargador.catalog.

You should write the following into the main.conf file (located in the same folder that contains Cargador executables):

<cargador>
    <root Value="x:\data\cargador.catalog" />
    <net_root Value="//SERVER/cargador.catalog" />
</cargador>

So if some file is stored in the catalogue with local path x:\data\cargador.catalog\someProject\file.foo, it means that its location for network users will be resolved by Cargador as //SERVER/cargador.catalog/someProject/file.foo (it doesn’t matter for Windows if there are forward slashes or backslashes in the path).

If you have workstations running under Linux or MacOS, this path will not work for them. To make the files accessible for Linux or MacOS users, you should do the procedure called directory mapping (see chapter “Directory Mapping”).

Note

In this example you may skip the directory mapping for Linux-based workstations. Instead of mapping, create local folders /SERVER/cargador.catalog on the workstations and mount the catalogue network path there. In this case Linux will locate the network files by the direct path //SERVER/cargador.catalog/someProject/file.foo.

Warning

Pay attention to the letter case when dealing with case sensitive operating systems.

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